Tagged: mozilla taiwan

Web Rendering Week — Recap

So I’m back home now. The flight home was a bit shorter, about two hours, thankfully. Interestingly enough I feel more jet lagged now that I’m home then I was in Taiwan. I’ve heard that going east is worse then going west, so that might be the case for me right now. The rest of the rendering week, after I blogged last Tuesday, was just as awesome as the first part.

How Gecko Does X

I got to sit in on a lot more talks about “How Gecko does X” — like how the graphics engine works, how the layout system works, and my favourite in particular, how cycle collection works. Kyle Huey did an excellent job explaining how the Gecko cycle collector works. He gave us this paper as forward reading about it (it’s a little dense, but definitely worth reading). I’ll try to do a blog post in the future on what I learned/will learn about it.

David Baron and Adam Roach also gave an awesome talk on how the W3C and IETF work. WEBVTT is my first major exposure to open specifications that I’ve had and so I’ve been interested in all the hows/whats/whys of open specifications and the politics behind them.

Initial WEBVTT Support

It wasn’t all fun and games over in Taiwan though. We were also doing a lot of work. We finally got bug 833385 landed near to the end of the week. This means that we have support for all the new DOM elements that WEBVTT introduces such as: HTMLTrackElement, TextTrack, TextTrackList, TextTrackCue, and TextTrackCueList. We ran into a random inexplicable bug when we were doing full tries on the code, just before landing it. Ralph and I went to work debugging it (had to use an ASAN build) and we ended up discovering that it happened in a very rare situation where the cycle collector nulls out the HTMLMediaElement’s TextTrackList member while the HTMLMediaElement is still alive. This results in a situation where HTMLMediaElement::FireTimeUpdate() is called just before it is about to be deleted and since we weren’t doing null checks on the call to TextTrackList::Update() we would crash. After we got that fixed we were all green.

That leaves just bug 833382 left before we get initial support for WEBVTT. It was going well last week and we got an r+ from Chris Pearce. Now we just need an r+ from Boris and we should be good to go. It might take a few more rounds of review before that happens, but I’m optimistic we will be able to get this landed within a week or so.

One of the major problems I was having in Taiwan was trying to get a clean diff for 833382. The problem centered around the fact that up until now, mainly in my previous open-source class, we decided to use a git branch as a main point of ‘integration’. We’ve all been working off this branch for a while. The history of this branch has been so ridiculous and the code necessary for 833382 depends on so many other parts of the code that have been touched by, well everyone, that it was pretty much impossible for me to do a clean diff or even get a good rebase. To rebase this beast I would have had to go through 150+ commits, each having merge conflicts… So I ended up just making a clean branch off master and manually moving all the code that I needed over to the new branch and doing a diff like that. I’ll probably be staying away from these kinds of ‘integration’ branches in the future in order to ensure that my repo history can be more linear. Easier to get diffs that way.

The other thing I’ve been dealing with in the last few days is some code we landed back in February that was spotted to not be up to par by Boris. The issue is with some of the CSS selectors that we are using to style WEBVTT text — namely, we are using slow CSS selectors which is bad. This is the first that I’ve heard about some CSS selectors being slower than others, although that’s not suprising as I’m not super-super knowledgeable about CSS. Mozilla even has a page devoted to this that you can check out here. Ralph and I put together a patch yesterday to deal with this which will land today most likely. I’ll have to update 833382 to reflect those changes today as well.

CSS Parser Hacking

I also sat in on the vertical-text layout meeting as it is of particular interest to WEBVTT. WEBVTT requires the ability to have vertical-text and so far in Gecko we don’t have this. Apparently vertical-text has been kind of a thorn in the side of the layout team for a long time as it’s been particularly hard to implement. However, there is a major push now to get it done, so that’s great. In accordance with this Daniel Holbert asked me if I wanted to do some stuff for vertical-text in the CSS parser, I accepted and got my first layout bug! So I’ll be hacking around in the CSS parser and layout section of Gecko more in the future, hopefully.

WebMaker

Dave also told me the other day that he’s figured out an area of WebMaker that I can start contributing to, so I’m excited about that. I’ll be starting in about two weeks on this. I’ll most likely be splitting my time like 70/30 or something like that for WEBVTT and WebMaker. We talked briefly about it and so my understanding isn’t 100%, but what I got from our talk is that I will be implementing a kind of wrapper around an HTML5 video element that will allow Popcorn Maker to be able to work with it. From my understanding Popcorn Maker works with many different video formats/sources and so it needs a uniform interface to work with all these different videos. That’s where the wrapper comes in. It allows Popcorn Maker to work with many different video formats and sources without worrying about the particulars. However, all this might be completely wrong¬† as I might have misunderstood some things from our brief conversation… So don’t take my word for it! At any rate I’ll do another blog post about it when I get more information.

Until next time.

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Getting Ready For Taiwan

A month back I found out that Caitlin and I were being invited to Mozilla’s Web Rendering Week in Taiwan. Needless to say I was shocked. Ralph Giles, who has been working with us closely on WEBVTT and was/is our main contact with Mozilla for WEBVTT, kindly invited us out — thanks Ralph!!

Therefore, a lot of this week has been spent getting ready for the trip — getting ready to travel and trying to push on some final bugs to get initial support for WEBVTT into Nightly before we leave.

Getting that initial support entailed a few things, all of which haven’t happened yet… Don’t worry though! If we don’t get it finished before Taiwan we will definitely get it finished while we’re in Taiwan. We need(ed) too:

  • Get the WEBVTT library to a state where we felt comfortable tagging 0.5 and landing it in Gecko.
  • Land the DOM implementation of HTMLTrackElement and the TextTrack objects.
  • Land the parser and Gecko integration bug.

Getting WEBVTT to 0.5 was pretty easy. The only extra thing we wanted to add before 0.5 was support for the new <lang> tag. We needed a new string list pop function for that as well. I implemented that this week, which also exposed a bug that we hadn’t found yet because we didn’t have a proper test for it. The bug happened when we had an <rt> tag that was not enclosed within a <ruby> tag. In these situations the <rt> tag should not be processed. We weren’t handling it correctly and it was crashing the parser. That got landed as well yesterday. We tagged 0.5 and Caitlin is working on the bug to land it in Gecko now. WEBVTT 0.5 contains a lot of good things like sec-critical bug fixes and library usability fixes.

Ralph is very close to landing the DOM implementation. That should be happening within the next few days. The parser integration is getting close as well. I’ve been working on changing the code that converts the C node tree to a DOM tree from a recursive algorithm to an iterative one. It’s been a little tricky as we need to keep track of where we are in the C tree as we iterate over it, as well as where we are in the tree of DOM nodes that we are creating. We also need to keep track of the ‘last branching parent’ so that we’re able to tell when we need to go back up the tree. I have a solution that I put together that will hopefully be able to get an r+. I’ll have it up for review tonight on the bug.

The other major thing I did this week was give a presentation to CDOT about WEBVTT. You can check out the presentation over on my GitHub page. It was recorded so maybe you all can see it at some point when it gets posted! I’ll link at that time.

Until next time.